High Potassium Early Baby Foods

 

After introducing cereals, the next food to introduce to baby is fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables contain many high potassium foods. It is good to introduce high potassium foods to baby, since the habits begun at this age carry over into older age.

You can begin to allow baby to choose between a few foods as you introduce one food at a time. Recent studies have shown if babies choose foods at these early stages, they tend to continue these foods as they get older. This is why it is important to introduce high potassium foods at an early age. It creates a habit that they will continue as they get older. If the wrong foods are introduced at these early stages, they will continue to eat them. Introducing sweetened and salted foods will tend to carry over into childhood and adulthood. This may be partly responsible for the recent increase in childhood obesity and diabetes.

At 4 to 6 months the baby begins to have better control of the tongue. Until this age the baby has had little control and does mostly a pushing motion with the tongue as a reflex to aid nursing from the breast or bottle, which why so much food winds up anywhere but in the mouth. At 6 to 7 months begin the baby fruits and vegetables. The food should be strained, and unsalted and unsweetened.

The recommendations from the Institute of Medicine for sodium and potassium intake can be found at this table. For an infant 0 to 6 months old an adequate intake of sodium is 120 mg per day, and for potassium 400 mg per day. For the 7 to 12 month old an adequate intake of sodium is 370 mg per day and potassium is 700 mg per day. Remember, breast milk has potassium also.

The table has the fruits generally recommended by pediatricians. These are also high potassium foods with the favorable ratio we have discussed in the past. They are low in sodium (salt) and unsweetened.

The weights all are grams except for the potassium and sodium, which are milligrams. The calories, protein, total fat, carbohydrate, sugar, fiber, potassium and sodium values given are for 100 grams of food.

The serving size and weight for a baby differs from 100 grams, so we have listed the serving weight and the common measurement that corresponds to that weight.

K is potassium. Na is sodium.

Except for the potassium to sodium ratio and the amount of potassium per serving (which we calculated), the source of data is:

USDA National Nutrient Database Standard Reference – Release 22

 

Food

Serving Wt

Seerving Size

Calories

Protein

Total Fat

Carb'drt 

Fiber

Sugar

Potassium

Sodium

Ratio K:Na

K per Serving

Fruit, applesauce, strained

16

1 tbsp

41

0.2

0.2

10.8

1.7

9.87

71

2

35.5

11

Fruit, bananas with apples and pears, strained

15

1 tbsp

84

0.9

0.22

19.7

1.4

12.76

233

7

33.3

35

Fruit, peaches, strained

16.72

1 tbsp

65

0.94

0.33

14.48

1.3

11.5

195

6

32.5

33

Fruit, pears, strained

16

1 tbsp

42

0.3

0.2

10.8

3.6

6.98

130

2

65

21

Vegetable, butternut squash and corn

113

1 jar, Gerber (4 oz)

50

2

0.6

9.3

2

2.93

352

5

70.4

398

Vegetables, carrots, strained

224

1 cup

27

0.8

0.1

6

1.7

3.64

196

37

5.3

439

Vegetables, corn and sweet potatoes, strained

28.35

1 oz

68

1.26

0.28

15.23

1.8

4

154

33

4.7

44

Vegetables, garden vegetable, strained

28.35

1 oz

32

2.3

0.2

6.8

1.5

2.57

168

35

4.8

48

Vegetables, green beans and potatoes

113

1 jar, Gerber (4 oz)

62

2.2

1.9

9

1.4

2.35

148

18

8.2

167

Vegetables, green beans, strained

240

1 cup

27

1.2

0.17

6.29

2.2

1.88

146

5

29.2

350

Vegetables, peas, strained

15.6

1 tbsp

50

3.27

0.43

8.36

2

2.01

106

7

15.1

17

Vegetables, squash, strained

16.46

1 tbsp

28

0.81

0.2

5.73

0.9

3.37

185

6

30.8

30

Vegetables, sweet potatoes strained

224

1 cup

57

1.1

0.1

13.2

1.5

4.05

263

20

13.2

589